The Raspberry Pi Foundation’s vision is to make computing affordable that would improve programming skills and hardware understanding at the pre-university level. It has grown from an enthusiastic community to one of the best-selling PC’s of all time. So, it’s not a surprise when it introduces a $25 computer that shares some of the capabilities as its $35 Model B+.

The Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+ has support for Bluetooth 4.2, 2.4GHz and 5GHz Wi-Fi, making it easier to use anytime, anywhere.

The new $25 model has all the process and wireless power of the 3 B+ on a PC that’s two-thirds the size. It’s equipped with 1.4GHz Broadcom processor, 512MB RAM, and a dual-band 802.11 b/g/n/ac wireless LAN and Bluetooth 4.2.

Raspberry Model 3 A+ Pi

Small but perfectly formed.

Quite similar to the 3 B+, the 3 A+ has a full-sized HDMI port for connecting to your monitor or TV, 3.5mm stereo audio out, and a full-sized USB A port. The miniature stature and powerful performance make the mini PC a perfect fit for games emulator projects or compact media center.

Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+ Features:

  • A 1.4GHz 64-bit quad-core ARM Cortex-A53 CPU
  • 512MB LPDDR2 SDRAM
  • Dual-band 802.11ac wireless LAN and Bluetooth 4.2/BLE
  • Improved USB mass-storage booting
  • Improved thermal management

The board is certified as a radio module under the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) which will help reduce the cost of quality testing on RaspberryPi-based products.

Raspberry Pi stated in a blog post that the 3 Model A+ is the last product in the ‘classic’ Raspberry Pi line: "In some ways this is rather a poignant product for us. Back in March, we explained that the 3+ platform is the final iteration of the 'classic' Raspberry Pi: whatever we do next will of necessity be less of an evolution, because it will need new core silicon, on a new process node, with new memory technology. So 3A+ is about closing things out in style, answering one of our most frequent customer requests, and clearing the decks so we can start to think seriously about what comes next," the company wrote.